How to make the most out of a small kitchen

A small kitchen is no easy foe for any cook. However, with a few home remedies and intelligent purchases, maximizing space and getting the most out of every inch you have available is possible. Here’s a handy guide to help you get started:



Choose Glassware Over Ceramic and Metal Ware: While sturdier and more efficient, ceramic and metal dishes take up more space than their glass counterparts. Invest in glass containers for food storage if you want the most out of your cabinet real estate.

Use Storage Containers as Countertop Organizers: You can never have too much storage. So please make use of all available spaces by placing containers on the countertops, where there would typically be no room for them. Be careful not to obstruct any sinks or counters when choosing your placement, though!

Invest In Collapsible Items: To maximize kitchen efficiency, look into items that fold away easily – like bags that can be flattened for storage or cutting boards that fit inside containers.

With a bit of extra effort, you’ll have increased the space efficiency in your small kitchen in no time! Plus, knowing that you could become more organized without having to spend money on remodeling is pretty satisfying in itself.

If what I just said made absolutely no sense, you’re not alone. Let me give an example of how it all works together.

A collapsible water bottle is excellent for people who want something lightweight and easy to store when not in use.



Placing a collapsible water bottle on your countertop is an excellent idea because there would have been no space for it if the water bottle wasn’t collapsible. A flat bag can be placed under a cabinet and easily folded up to store away when not being used. Your kitchen will look very lovely with glass storage containers, as long as you don’t put them too close to the sink or kitchen faucet so that they don’t become wet from water spills.

It’s also wise to invest in some collapsible items because they’re easy to store. And lastly, an article about maximizing space in small kitchens wouldn’t be helpful without mentioning how important it is to take advantage of all available spaces (like having something on the countertops).

Know your layout.

You can’t make changes if you don’t know what’s going on in there. So draw up some plans and figure out the best places to put things. Find out where you’re wasting space and draw it on your map so that once everything is put back into place, you’ll be able to see exactly where everything goes: this will help you see areas that need improvement or new solutions.

Clean house.

Get rid of whatever doesn’t need to be in the kitchen; more space and less clutter is always a good thing. Unfortunately, many people don’t know what to do with certain items, so they put them in drawers or cabinets where they’ll end up staying forever. If you can’t figure out how to store it properly, throw the item away. You shouldn’t be using it if you can’t figure out how to use it efficiently anyway!



The hardest part about getting the most out of your kitchen is filling everything back in seamlessly. Remember that clean house? You’ve got to make sure everything goes back exactly where it came from – including all the little knick-knacks and decorations that’ll just get misplaced again if left alone.

Take time after putting everything back in to make sure nothing is sticking out or jammed in. Then, when it’s all put away, the only thing you should notice when you walk in is how much more open and spacious your room looks.

Think vertical.

Virtual space isn’t just horizontal – get up high! If possible, install shelves on lower cabinets so that taller items can be stored there instead of under the countertops where they’ll go unused. This also gives a nice bit of extra storage for less used appliances such as slow cookers or hand mixers. Utilize any height you can: hanging pots and pans from hooks on walls and cupboards will free up shelf space and save wear and tear on your items.



A place for everything.

You want things to stay organized so that you can quickly and easily find what you’re looking for. First, do a little research and ask friends and family about the best places to put certain items. If they don’t know, try checking cooking blogs or searching online to see if someone has posted about it – most kitchen-related problems have been solved already! Also, having all your items in one place will make cleaning a breeze: wipe down each area after cooking instead of trying to deal with a giant mess on the countertops.

Use baskets.

They’re not just useful for holding fruit on the kitchen table anymore. Baskets are great for corralling items such as small appliances, kitchenware, and cooking accessories. They can be used to hold things in drawers and on shelves: the only limit is your imagination!

Buy a pegboard.

If you want an easy way to keep things organized, but don’t have a budget for fancy racks or cupboards, invest some time building a pegboard. Pick up some wood from Home Depot and hang it on your wall – now you’ve got a place to quickly stash saucepans and other bulky pots that would typically take up space under the kitchen sink. Alternatively, if you’re short on space, build a smaller one just big enough for mugs and bowls, so they don’t pile up in the sink. Your new storage system is versatile and customizable, and you can paint it to match your decor!

Think like a chef.

If you’re not careful, it’s easy for spices and ingredients to get lost in the back of drawers. Invest in some drawer dividers to keep everything organized: they make managing more efficient and less frustrating by compartmentalizing items – perfect for tiny kitchens with minimal storage space!

Don’t let your small kitchen limit your cooking ability. With the right know-how and a bit of creativity, there’s no stopping you from whipping up something delicious any time of day.

The most frustrating part about having a small kitchen is that you can’t fit everything in it. If you end up with too many items to put away, the simplest solution is usually to get rid of something – but what if there’s no room left? Instead of keeping useless junk around, try putting it outside for trash day or selling it on eBay. The less clutter you have in your house, the better off you’ll be.

Don’t get overwhelmed! Remember that it’s easier to do small things instead of one big project, so go with that mentality. Tackle one cabinet at a time, then move on to the next area. Make sure you take your time and get everything exactly where you want it – if you’re not happy with how something looks in its new space, put it back until you decide what else would look better there. Small steps add up over time: before long, all your hard work will pay off in a clean kitchen that works for you.

 

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