This post includes three distinct strategies for removing fly poop from a lampshade. The first method consists of using dish soap and water; the second method uses a vinegar spray; and the third method makes use of a natural enzyme cleaning.

Take notice that none of these solutions will work unless you first remove the shade from the lamp that they are intended to be used on!

If you don’t want to do that, you can use one or more of these approaches instead on any surface in the area where there is a possibility that there is fly feces.

Consider purchasing an e-cloth to replace your standard cleaning cloths in the future so that you may make things easier on yourself. They are quite effective in cleaning up organic messes, such as the feces left behind by flies. To read about my experiences working with them, go here.

1) Some dish detergent and water

Dish soap, water, paper towels or a microfiber cloth, and a trash bag are the necessary components for this task.

Don’t use any kind of bleach! Your lampshade’s color will suffer as a result of this.

As a result of its superior ability to cut through oil, dish soap is an excellent product for cleaning organic messes. Mix one gallon of warm water with four tablespoons of liquid dish soap. Before moving on to the next step of the cleaning process, check to see that the lampshade does not have any traces of surplus liquid by first saturating a microfiber cloth or paper towel in the cleaning solution and then wringing out the towel until it is only moist. Applying this concoction to the damaged area in the same manner as you would any other cleaning product is recommended (you can use more than one paper towel if necessary).

Dish soap and water can be used to wash dishes, but some people recommend adding vinegar to the combination instead of or in addition to dish soap. This is due to the fact that vinegar has properties that are comparable to those of dish soap in terms of its ability to cut through oil. You can also add salt if you like! The abrasiveness of the cleaning solution will be increased by the addition of salt, which will help cut through organic debris such as fly dung!

When working with a cloth made of microfibers, it is important to keep in mind that bleach should not be used on the cloth itself because bleach can ruin microfiber materials. Instead, it is recommended to hand wash both microfiber cloths and paper towels in cold water with a small amount of mild detergent (or even better, no detergent at all!). If you use warm water, the dyes in your cleaning solutions can seep into the thing you’re cleaning, which would result in the item being damaged. Then you should either put it in the dryer or hang it up to dry.

Instructions from Zazzy Home on how to remove fly guano from a lampshade
If you don’t have any paper towels or cloth made of microfiber, you can make do with an old shirt that you don’t mind tearing up instead. The same guidelines that applied to the other two items also apply to this one: no bleach, warm water only, and line drying only!

After allowing enough time for all of the cleaning chemicals to be absorbed into the fly feces, remove as much of it as you can using either your hand or a plastic scraper. After you have finished this step, grab your waste bag and place it over the lampshade. This will prevent any mess from falling onto your floor, carpet, or rugs. Make sure the trash bag is large enough to completely include the lamp shade that you just cleaned!

Turn on the light so that the bulb may warm up as it operates. The warmth should assist in dislodging the fly feces that are still present. Remove the trash bag and switch off the lamp as soon as you feel that the situation has been resolved to your satisfaction. Repeat steps 1 through 5 using a new cleaning solution (dish soap and water or a mixture of vinegar and salt), and keep doing this until all of the fly feces have been cleaned.

2) Vinegar spray

You will need the following materials: baking soda, undiluted white vinegar (or, if you prefer, apple cider vinegar), paper towels or a microfiber cloth, a waste bag, and dish soap (optional).

Don’t use any kind of bleach! Your lampshade’s color will suffer as a result of this.

The guidelines that applied to the solution of dish soap and water also apply here, including the prohibition on the use of bleach, the requirement to rinse with warm water, and the recommendation to dry the surface with fresh air.

To one gallon of boiling water, add a quarter cup of white vinegar (or apple cider vinegar, if you like). Before moving on to the next step of the cleaning process, make sure that the lampshade does not have any surplus liquid by soaking a paper towel or a microfiber cloth in the solution and then wringing it out until it is only moist. After that, apply this concoction to the damaged region in the same manner as you would any other cleaning product (you can use more than one paper towel if necessary).

Baking soda is an alternative to or an addition to ordinary white or apple cider vinegar as a component of the vinegar spray, according to the recommendations of certain individuals. This is due to the fact that baking soda has properties that are analogous to those of vinegar and dish soap when it comes to the process of removing organic waste like fly excrement! You can also add salt if you like! On the other hand, adding salt to the cleaning solution will make it more abrasive, which will make it easier to eradicate organic messes like fly excrement.

When working with a cloth made of microfibers, it is important to keep in mind that bleach should not be used on the cloth itself because bleach can ruin microfiber materials. Instead, it is recommended to hand wash both microfiber cloths and paper towels in cold water with a small amount of mild detergent (or even better, no detergent at all!). If you use warm water, the dyes in your cleaning solutions can seep into the thing you’re cleaning, which would result in the item being damaged. Then you should either put it in the dryer or hang it up to dry.

If you don’t have any paper towels or cloth made of microfiber, you can make do with an old shirt that you don’t mind tearing up instead. The same guidelines that applied to the other two items also apply to this one: no bleach, warm water only, and line drying only!

After allowing enough time for all of the cleaning chemicals to be absorbed into the fly feces, remove as much of it as you can using either your hand or a plastic scraper. After you have finished this step, grab your waste bag and place it over the lampshade. This will prevent any mess from falling onto your floor, carpet, or rugs. Make sure the trash bag is large enough to completely include the lamp shade that you just cleaned!

The heat from the bulb ought to be able to assist in dislodging whatever flypoop is still there. In a similar vein, the warmth ought to be able to assist in dislodging the leftover fly feces. Remove the trash bag and switch off the lamp as soon as you feel that the situation has been resolved to your satisfaction. Repeat steps 1 through 5 with a new cleaning solution (dish soap and water or a mixture of vinegar and salt) and keep going until all of the fly feces have been cleaned!

3) A mixture of baking soda and vinegar to be sprayed

You will need the following materials: baking soda, undiluted white vinegar (or, if you prefer, apple cider vinegar), paper towels or a microfiber cloth, a waste bag, and dish soap (optional).

Don’t use any kind of bleach! Your lampshade’s color will suffer as a result of this. The same guidelines on what kinds of cleaners are acceptable and which ones are not apply here as they did with the solution of dish soap and water: no bleach, warm water, and air drying are required!

To one gallon of boiling water, add a quarter cup of white vinegar (or apple cider vinegar, if you like). Before moving on to the next step of the cleaning process, make sure that the lampshade does not have any surplus liquid by soaking a paper towel or a microfiber cloth in the solution and then wringing it out until it is only moist. After that, apply this concoction to the damaged region in the same manner as you would any other cleaning product (you can use more than one paper towel if necessary).

If you don’t have any paper towels or cloth made of microfiber, you can make do with an old shirt that you don’t mind tearing up instead. The same guidelines that applied to the previous two things must be followed here as well: no bleach, warm water, and air drying!

After allowing enough time for all of the cleaning chemicals to be absorbed into the fly feces, remove as much of it as you can using either your hand or a plastic scraper. After you have finished this step, grab your waste bag and place it over the lampshade. This will prevent any mess from falling onto your floor, carpet, or rugs. Make sure the trash bag is large enough to completely include the lamp shade that you just cleaned!

The heat from the bulb ought to be able to assist in dislodging whatever flypoop is still there. In a similar vein, the warmth ought to be able to assist in dislodging the leftover fly feces. Remove the trash bag and switch off the lamp as soon as you feel that the situation has been resolved to your satisfaction. Apply a new cleaning solution (a mixture of dish soap and water or vinegar and salt) and continue this process until all of the fly droppings have been removed!

It is my goal that these instructions will get you started on cleaning your lamps. If any of you wonderful readers happen to be in possession of other strategies, kindly share them with the rest of us in the comments section, and together we will prevail over the poop.

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